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3 Things You Should Know About Owning A Water Well

Sourcing water from a private well on your property is more likely than you may think. Millions of households rely upon water walls, as opposed to publicly sourced water. In fact, lots of people prefer to drink from their own wells rather than drinking city water. But if you’ve never used water wells before, you may be intimidated by the process, and for that matter may be worried about how to ensure that your water is of the right quality. At times, well water is considered preferable to city water, due to the fact that it is more under individual control, and you’ll know exactly where the water you’re drinking came from. But there are some steps that you should take after moving to a property with a private well for drinking water. Let’s look into them below.

1. Understand Hard Water

Once you take on your own private well, you first need to make sure that you understand the difference between hard water and soft water. One of the main concerns that people have about drinking well water is that it may be hard water. Hard water is water that is high in mineral content, especially dissolved calcium and magnesium. Water becomes hard when it percolates through deposits of chalk, limestone, or gypsum. While at first glance the idea of drinking water high in minerals might not be such a bad thing, there are a number of problems that come with relying upon hard water for not only your drinking water but the water that you shower with and use in your sinks. Hard water can wear down plumbing systems as well as toilets, sinks, and shower or bath setups faster than soft water would. It can cause your sinks to drain more slowly, and for that matter result in dingy laundry. Hard water has also been connected to skin issues. Many report suffering from rashes and itchiness after bathing in hard water, though more severe reactions are possible if you are allergic to some of the materials in your water. Some, of course, simply don’t like hard water due to its flavor. You can determine whether or not your water is hard through hard water tests. Generally speaking, the guidelines for the classifications of waters are as follows: when water has zero to 60 milligrams of calcium carbonate per liter, it is classified as soft. When it has 61 to 120 milligrams per liter, it is moderately hard, 121 to 180 milligrams per liter means that it is hard, and anything about 180 milligrams per liter is very hard.

2. Utilize Water Softening Services

So, you’ve had your water wells undergo water tests and have discovered that the water is harder than you would like. Fortunately, water softening services are available. Generally speaking, the most common form of water softener is a whole-house filtration system. This will remove the calcium and magnesium materials from your water through the ion exchange process, though this is not the only type of water softener available. Commercial systems often add lime to their water systems to soften it, while others prefer a reverse osmosis process.

3. Test For More Than Hardness

There are a lot of reasons why you should have your water wells tested, going beyond the issue of hard water. Well water can become contaminated with a variety of different substances. Uranium, radon, and even arsenic can dissolve into the groundwater and ultimately end up in your well water. Hence, it’s crucial that you Get your home tested for Radon today! You should speak with your local water treatment experts to know exactly what to be on the lookout for in your area and to make sure that you are taking proactive steps to treat your water. Of course, if you live near any kind of agricultural area, like a farm, you should already be cautious. Agricultural systems contaminate well water rather easily.

There is an extra level of responsibility that comes with water wells. But there are also a lot of benefits, including the aforementioned control over your own water. Research before investing in a property with a well, and you’ll get the hang of it in no time!